August 1, 2015: Antibiotics, conservation, fossils and spice

BLOCKOUTALLnswk_2015_stacked_reverse_smallThis week we proudly announced that Sciengist will be hosting the National Science Communication Challenge for National Science Week 2015. Sciengist also explored health, in regards to antibiotics and the power the humble cumin seed may offer.

Antibiotic resistance is leading us to a new era where their power may no longer save us

Sir Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 (Image: www.biography.com)

Sir Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 (Image: www.biography.com)

 

Prior to the discovery of antibiotics, death was common, as a result of what we now consider minor infections, bumps or scratches.

We have used and abused antibiotics for too long now. And the result of our drug misuse is already rearing its ugly, devastating head.

The future security of antibiotics is in our hands. I urge you to find out how you can personally make a difference.

Increased conservation efforts are required to save Malayan tigers from extinction

Malayan tiger populations are critically low (Image: WWF)

Malayan tiger populations are critically low (Image: WWF)

 

This week, the World Wildlife Fund pledged to double global tiger numbers by 2022.

Global tiger populations are reducing at an alarming rate.

While current conservation strategies may be yielding some results, the threats Malayan tiger populations face may be too great for conventional conservation strategies.

Identification of fossil evidence classifies ancient relative of the velvet worm

An artist's impression of Hallucigenia sparsa (Danielle Dufault)  Copied from:  http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2015/06/25/4261794.htm

An artist's impression of Hallucigenia sparsa (Image: Danielle Dufault souced from http://www.abc.net.au)

 

Hallucigenia is the name ascribed to a creature, identified purely from fossil records found in the Burgess Shale.

It was initially named Hallucigenia as its presumed appearance could be likened to an hallucination!

The animal has since been described and re-described but has finally been classified as an ancient relative of the velvet worm, Peripatus. Read the gist of it here.

Cumin seeds may decrease brain degeneration, particularly in Alzheimer’s disease

Cumin seeds are believed to have many health benefits. www.savoryspicesshop.com

Cumin seeds are believed to have many health benefits (Image: www.savoryspicesshop.com)

 

Cumin seeds are a staple addition to a variety of cuisines.

For many cultures, they are a daily staple.

Although the flavour of cumin seeds may be inconspicuous, their power in neuro-protection is slowly being uncovered.

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